Writing conclusions for academic essays

Prewriting and Outlining Get tips on developing and outlining your topic.

Writing conclusions for academic essays

At the same time the discourse community does not expect to see any writing that appears too foreign. For this reason the academic writer must follow the constraints see article section below set by the discourse community so his or her ideas earn approval and respect.

They define what is an acceptable argument. Each discourse community expects to see a writer construct his or her argument using their conventional style of language and vocabulary, and they expect a writer to use the established intertext within the discourse community as the building blocks for his or her argument.

Writing for a discourse community[ edit ] In order for a writer to become familiar with some of the constraints of the discourse community they are writing for, a useful tool for the academic writer is to analyze prior work from the discourse community.

Across most discourses communities, writers will: For example, the way a claim is made in a high school paper would look very different from the way a claim is made in a college composition class. Porter Contrary to some beliefs, this is by no means plagiarism. Writers should also be aware of other ways in which the discourse community shapes their writing.

The following sections elaborate on these functions. The article states that "A fact derived from the Latin factum, see below is something that has really occurred or is actually the case".

But this is not how writers think of facts. Writing professionals hold that, "In a rhetorical argument, a fact is a claim that an audience will accept as being true without requiring proof". The audience can be thought of as a discourse community, and a fact can suddenly change to become an opinion if stated in a different discourse community.

This is how writers within discourse communities manage to present new ideas to their communities. Therefore, knowing the intended discourse community is a very important part of writing. Across discourse communities, what is considered factual may fluctuate across each community.

You, like most people, would probably classify the statement "the Earth is round" as a "fact.

Thinking About Your Essay Conclusion

Misconceptions regarding making a novel argument[ edit ] Within discourse communities, writers build on top of the ideas established by previous writers. But this is simply not the case.

Discourse communities introduce new ideas and claims, and from these, writers expand on them. James Porter, a scholar of Rhetoric at Indiana University, uses The Declaration of Independence as an example to illustrate this point.

Porter points out that Jefferson merely pulled the phrase "That all men are created equal" straight from his commonplace book he made as a boy. Jefferson wrote this great work by weaving together the intertext of his discourse community. As Greene describes in his article, "Argument as Conversation", academic writing can be thought of metaphorically as a conversation between those in the discourse community.

Just like in a conversation when you listen to the ideas of the others who are involved and formulate your own opinion on the topic, a writer may be reading a paper done by another writer in the discourse community and from this paper, the scholar may obtain inspiration to expand the claims expressed in the paper or address them from other angles.

Good academic writers know the importance of researching previous work from within the discourse community and using this work to build their own claims.

By taking these ideas and expanding upon them or applying them in a new way, a writer is able to make their novel argument. Intertextuality[ edit ] Intertextuality is the combining of past writings into original, new pieces of text.

Writing conclusions for academic essays

The term intertextuality was coined in by Julia Kristeva. All texts are necessarily related to prior texts through a network of links, writers often unwittingly make use of what has previously been written and thus some degree of borrowing is inevitable.

This generally occurs within a specific discourse community.Prewriting and Outlining Get tips on developing and outlining your topic. In this blog, we review various academic writing resources such as academic phrasebank, academic wordlists, Academic Phrases for Writing Abstract Section of a Research Paper An abstract is a self-contained and short synopsis that describes a larger work.

Rhetorical functions in academic writing Introduction. Students are asked to write many different kinds of texts.

Depending on your subject, these could be essays, laboratory reports, case-studies, book reviews, reflective diaries, posters, research proposals, and so on and are normally referred to as genres (See: genres in academic writing.

Conclusion example from a literature paper

A conclusion is an important part of the paper; it provides closure for the reader while reminding the reader of the contents and importance of the paper. It accomplishes this by stepping back from the specifics in order to view the bigger picture of the document.

Conclusion paragraphs are about 5% of your essay word count (e.g. about 50 or so words per word essay). In clearly-written sentences, you restate the thesis from your introduction (but do not repeat the introduction too closely), make a brief summary of your evidence and finish with some sort of judgment about the topic.

The conclusion might make the new but related point that the novel on the whole suggests that such an integration is (or isn't) possible. Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay: Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long- .

What is academic writing? - OWLL - Massey University